Skip to Content
Menu
Seton Hall University
women smiling

Conference on Women and Gender 2019

Friday, March 29, 2019

The Women and Gender Studies Program is pleased to announce that the annual Seton Hall University Conference on Women and Gender will be held on Friday, March 29, 2019, from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

About the Conference

The past year has seen tremendous change and revealed places where there is potential or need for change. New forces and historical forces alike have shaped the world and its systems such as economies, legislatures, schools, religions, arts, and media. This year's conference addresses the issues driving change and prompting the resistance to it, offering papers that engage critically with women's and gender issues in the world today, in the distant or recent past, and in possible or probable developments or challenges in the future. This year, Seton Hall University again offers a conference comprised of exciting sessions that reflect the dynamic, productive diversity of perspectives and approaches characterizing the current discussion about these subjects.

The conference's primary goal is consistent with the ideals of a liberal arts institution such as those articulated by Cardinal Newman in The Idea of a University: to provide an interface between the academic and the experiential in order to enrich lived life.

Keynote Speaker

Danielle McGuire 222 picDanielle McGuire will be the keynote speaker. McGuire is the author of At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape and Resistance–a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power. The book has been widely recognized for its groundbreaking discovery of Rosa Parks’ work for justice in the case of Recy Taylor, a twenty-four year old mother and sharecropper, who was raped by a group of white men. McGuire reframes the Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Black Power movement, in terms of black women’s protests against sexual violence and harassment. The book has won multiple awards, including the Frederick Jackson Turner Award and the Lillian Smith Award and has been reviewed in a variety of national publications. Her research has also lent itself to a documentary on the Recy Taylor case.

Presentation of the annual "Woman of the Year" Award

This university award, sponsored by the Office of the Provost, recognizes and honors outstanding leaders at Seton Hall who have made significant contributions to the success of women at the University. In celebration of Women's History Month and the Seton Hall University Women's Conference, we are seeking nominations for the University's 2018 Woman of the Year.  Learn more about this prestigious award and to submit a nomination »

Travel Information

Nestled in the charming village of South Orange, New Jersey, Seton Hall University is easily accessible by car, bus and train. View directions to the University. For hotel accommodations, there are a few in the area that offer special rates to Seton Hall families and visitor. View a listing of area hotels.

Regarding air travel, Newark Liberty Airport is the closest and most convenient airport to campus. 

Register Now

When registering, please be sure to purchase a ticket option that includes lunch if you will be attending the luncheon. Only participants who have purchased a ticket to attend the lunch will be seated.

Conference Schedule

8:00 - 10:30 a.m: Registration, Stafford 210
8:00 - 9:15 a.m: Awards Breakfast, Jubilee Atrium
9:30 - 10:30 a.m. Session I, Stafford Hall
10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.  Keynote, Jubilee Hall Auditorium
12:30 - 1:30 p.m.  Luncheon and Woman of the Year, Jubilee Hall Atrium
1:45 - 2:45 p.m. Session II, Stafford Hall
3:00 - 4:00 p.m. Session III, Stafford Hall
Session I: 9:30 - 10:30 a.m.
Stafford 205

Women in STEM: Perspectives from the Sciences Roundtable

  • Elizaveta Sidorova, Undergraduate, Seton Hall University
  • Ana DaSilva, M.A. Student, Seton Hall University
  • Susan Nolan, Professor of Psychology, Seton Hall University
  • Andrew Simon, Associate Professor of Psychology, Seton Hall University
  • Cecilia Marzabadi, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Seton Hall University
  • Judith Stark, Professor Emerita of Philosophy, Seton Hall University
Stafford 206

Disrupting Expectations: Diversifying Gendered Narratives in the Global Studies Classroom (Roundtable)

  • Anne Giblin Gedacht, Assistant Professor of History, Seton Hall University
  • Cherubim Quizon, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Seton Hall University
  • Golbarg Rekabtalaei, Assistant Professor of History, Seton Hall University
  • Jeffrey Rice, Assistant Professor of Chinese Literature and Civilization, Seton Hall University
  • Kirsten Schultz, Associate Professor of History, Seton Hall University
  • Youssef Yacoubi, Assistant Professor of Arab Studies, Seton Hall University
Stafford 207

Gender, Power & Abuse: Social Scientific Views on Sexual Harassment & Sexual Violence (Roundtable)

  • C. Lynn Carr, Professor of Sociology, Seton Hall University
  • Leslie Bunnage, Associate Professor of Sociology, Seton Hall University
  • Christine Heer, Lecturer in Social Work, Seton Hall University
  • Roseanne Mirabella, Professor of Political Science and Public Affairs, Seton Hall University
Stafford 208

Structural Gendered Inequality in Global Perspective
Moderator: Nabeela Alam, Assistant Professor of Diplomacy, Seton Hall University

  • Jordan Priest, Honors Student, Redlands University, "The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women"
  • Aspen Christian, Graduate Student, The City University of New York, "Intergenerational Adolescent Motherhood"

10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Keynote, Jubilee Hall Auditorium
Dr. Danielle McGuire, "The Radical Roots of #MeToo: Race, Sexual Violence and the Meaning of Freedom."

Danielle McGuire is an Associate Professor of History at Wayne State University and the author of At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape and Resistance–a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power (Knopf, 2010). McGuire reframes the Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Black Power movement, in terms of black women's protests against sexual violence and harassment. The book has won multiple awards, including the Frederick Jackson Turner Award and the Lillian Smith Award and has been reviewed in a variety of national publications. Her research has also lent itself to a documentary on the Recy Taylor case.

12:30-1:30 p.m. Luncheon and Woman of the Year, Jubilee Hall Atrium

Session II: 1:45 - 2:45 p.m.
Stafford 205

The Woman in the Iron Coffin: a glimpse into the life of an African-American woman in mid-19th century Queens, NYC
Moderator: Vanessa May, Associate Professor of History, Seton Hall University

  • Scott Warnasch, Archeologist, Consultant to the NYC Medical Examiner's Office, "Archaeological and archival evidence for the identity of the 'Woman in the Iron Coffin'"
  • Rhonda Quinn, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Seton Hall University, "Discerning early childhood residency of the 'Woman in the Iron Coffin' with anthropological geochemistry"
  • Monet Watson, Undergraduate, Seton Hall University, "Gauging Diet and Health of the 'Woman in the Iron Coffin' with Anthropological Geochemistry"
Stafford 206

Gendered Narratives Across Religious and Political Boundaries
Moderator: Peter Savastano, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Seton Hall University

  • Simeiqi He, Doctoral Student, Drew Theological School, "Catholic Lay Women and Marriage in 1960s America"
  • Colleen Conway, Professor of Religion, Seton Hall University, "Myths and Realities of Artificial Women"
  • Youssef Yacoubi, Assistant Professor of Arab Studies, Seton Hall University, "Women's Biographies in the Arab World: From the Rhetorics of Exemplarity to the Politics of Memoir"
Stafford 207

Dis/Ability Studies: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Moderator: W. King Mott, Associate Professor of Political Science, Seton Hall University

  • Dr. Kevin McCabe, University Core Fellow, Seton Hall University, "The Great Books and Their Others: Gender and Disability in the Classical Curriculum"
  • Katherine Prendella, Doctoral Student, School of Communication and Information, Rutgers University, "Disability and Media"
  • Roseanne Mirabella, Professor of Political Science and Public Affairs, Seton Hall University, "Group Bias and the Marginalization of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: The Complicity of Human Service Agencies in the Continued Privileging of 'Ableism'"
Stafford 208

Gender in Chinese Literature, Past and Present
Moderator: Anne Giblin Gedacht, Assistant Professor of History, Seton Hall University

  • Nicole O'Connor, M.A. candidate in Asian Studies, Seton Hall University, "The Prevalence of Ghost Marriages in Tang Dynasty China as Seen Through an Analysis of Ghost Stories"
  • Jeffrey Rice, Assistant Professor of Chinese Literature and Civilization, Seton Hall University, "'How Can She Not Be Condemned?' Women, Power and Historical Revisionism in 11th Century China"
  • Zhong Huang, Associate Professor of English Literature and Director of the Australian Studies Center, Wuhan University, PRC, "From 'Unreliable Man' to 'True Lover' - Shifting Images of Chinese Men in Writing by Chinese Australian Women Writers of Mainland Background"
Stafford 210

Sex Differences in Drug Taking Across Species
Moderator: Amy Hunter, Associate Professor of Psychology, Seton Hall University

  • Vincent Medina, M.S. Student in Experimental Psychology, Seton Hall University, "Estrogen Modulates Alcohol-Induced Memory Impairment in Rats"
  • Nadia Meshkati, Undergraduate, Seton Hall University, "Sex Differences in the Effects of Caffeine in Rats"
  • Michelle Pazdur, Undergraduate, Seton Hall University, "Paternal Cocaine Exposure in Mice Differentially Affects Male and Female Offspring"
  • JP Pedoto, Undergraduate, Seton Hall University, "Sex Differences, Gender, and Addiction in Humans"
Session III: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Stafford 205

Assessing Gender and Sexuality in Psychology
Moderator: Paige Fisher, Associate Professor of Psychology, Seton Hall University

  • Jozette Belmont, Graduate Student, The City University of New York, "Don't Be Hysterical!: Women's Sexuality in the DSM"
  • JP Pedeto, "Changing the Way We Assess Gender," Undergraduate, Seton Hall University
Stafford 206

Women and Gender Studies Program Undergraduate Essay Prize Winners 
Moderator: Angela Weisl, Professor of English, Seton Hall University

Stafford 207

Alice Austen House - New Perspectives on one of America's Earliest Female Photographers  

  • Michael Vigorito, Professor of Psychology, Seton Hall University
  • Victoria Munro, Executive Director of the Alice Austen House
Stafford 208

From Feminine Divine Speech to Internet Gendered Discourse: Case studies in the intersection of Gender, Communication, and Religion
Moderator: Donovan Sherman Associate Professor of English, Seton Hall University

  • Nicholas Marshall, Adjunct Professor of Religion, Seton Hall University, "Chabad and the 'Elevation' of Women"
  • Jon Radwan, Associate Professor of Communication, Journalism, and PR, Seton Hall University, "Communication Ethics in the Bhagavad Gita: Speech as Feminine Power of God"
  • Ruth Tsuria, Assistant Professor of Communication, Journalism, and PR, Seton Hall University, "Digital Media in the Jewish Bedroom: Exploring Jewish negotiation of gender and sexual norms online"
Stafford 210

Sleuthing in the Academy: Two Twentieth-Century Feminist Mystery Writers
Moderator: Mary Balkun, Professor of English, Seton Hall University

  • Lisa Rose-Wiles, Associate Professor, University Libraries, Seton Hall University, "Dorothy Sayers (1893-1957) Gaudy Night as a reflection of the Oxford Women's experience"
  • Marta Deyrup, Professor, University Libraries, Seton Hall University, "Carolyn Heilbrun (1926-2003): academic, mystery novelist and chronicler of New York second-wave feminism"

Questions?

Please contact the conference organizers, Dr. Vanessa May or Dr. Karen Gevirtz.

Back to top