Skip to Content
Department of Information Technology Logo

Course Design Models

The seven models below reflect different approaches to instructional delivery. The commonalities across them include:

  • Faculty expertise in determining pedagogical decisions within a selected model
  • The use of Blackboard as the central organizational frame for course materials, assignments, and assessments.
  • The commitment to strong learning communities, within a course, no matter how delivered or chosen form of reception.

HyFlex

In Hybrid-Flexible (HyFlex) classes, students select the mode by which they will receive instruction, online or in-person. In a HyFlex course, both online (synchronous) and fully classroom-based instruction are provided. Students will be online and in class as the day’s content is delivered. Faculty are actively engaged with both the students online and in the classroom, building opportunities for communication and collaboration between all learners. All course materials, assignments and assessments are housed in Blackboard. The live synchronous sessions should be facilitated in Microsoft Teams or Blackboard Collaborate Ultra. Both a Blackboard course shell and a Team is created for every course session offered at the University. Other technologies supported by the University should be used to enhance the teaching and learning experience. 1

Flipped Classroom

“The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. The notion of a flipped classroom draws on such concepts as active learning, student engagement, hybrid course design, and course podcasting. The value of a flipped class is in the repurposing of class time into a workshop where students can inquire about lecture content, test their skills in applying knowledge, and interact with one another in hands-on activities. Although implementing a flipped classroom places different demands on faculty and forces students to adjust their expectations, the model has the potential to bring about a distinctive shift in priorities—from merely covering material to working toward mastery of it.” A flipped classroom model can be used in many of the different modalities of teaching, Traditional, Hybrid, or Remote. Flipped Classroom. (n.d.).
Retrieved June 3, 2020

Hybrid

A hybrid course is defined as any course that replaces 30% or more of in-class seat time with online activities. The in-class time can be either face to face or synchronous. The relationship between the online and face to face sessions are carefully planned to make the most use of ‘in-class’ discussions and can provide students with a deeper understanding of the materials. All course materials, assignments and assessments are housed in Blackboard. Online/Hybrid Course Policy. (2017, November 2).
Retrieved June 5, 2020

Remote (Synchronous)

In a synchronous course, students and faculty meet at the same time/same day for instruction and learning via a web-conferencing tool such as Blackboard Collaborate or MS Teams. All course materials are stored in Blackboard for ease of access, assignment submission, and grading.

Online (Asynchronous)

An online course utilizes the Internet to deliver course content, correspondence, and assessment completely online, and does not generally meet in person. Physical materials, such as a textbook or lab materials, may be required for these courses. There are generally no set meeting days and times; however, the use of strategic synchronous sessions can provide students with a deeper understanding of the material. These sessions work best as optional and recorded to allow all students to benefit. All course materials are stored in Blackboard for ease of access, assignment submission, and grading. Online/Hybrid Course Policy. (2017, November 2).
Retrieved June 5, 2020

Self-Paced

In a self-paced course, students progress through a course at their own pace, although there can be a recommended timeline and/or a due date to complete the course. There is little to no interaction with faculty. Self-paced courses are ideal for remediation or certification type-courses.

Traditional Course

A traditional course is taught in the face-to-face format. Such courses may still utilize technology, such as online resources and activities, or flipped classroom strategies, but these activities are not meant to replace in-class seat time. Online/Hybrid Course Policy. (2017, November 2).
Retrieved June 5, 2020

 

1 Hybrid Flexible based on San Francisco State University . (n.d.). Using the “HyFlex” Course and Design Process | Online Learning Consortium, Inc. Retrieved June 5, 2020

  Assigned Room on Campus Required Synchronous Meetings Uses Blackboard
HyFlex Yes Yes Yes
Traditional Face to Face Yes Yes Highly Encouraged
Flipped Classroom Yes Yes Yes
Hybrid Yes Yes Yes
Remote No Yes Yes
Online Asynchronous No No Yes
Self-paced No No Yes
Back to top