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Seton Hall University

Program Review

As an institution of higher learning, Seton Hall curates and develops its academic programs on a constant basis and through a variety of filters, including Mission, scholarly strength and rigor, value to careers, and financial viability, among many others. There are at least four mechanisms through which the University exerts special focus on our academic programs, which work in complementary ways and on complementary scales.

Before a new program is even launched, its academic value, financial viability, and contribution to the overall SHU repertoire of programs is carefully analyzed by the Faculty curricular committees, the Provost's Office, and in some cases the Board of Regents.

When the University is faced with special opportunities (such as the ongoing Harvest our Treasures Strategic Plan) or challenges (such as the ongoing pandemic), we engage in Accelerated Program Sustainability Assessment (APSA), a process inclusive of faculty and administrators working together on select programs, identified as financially challenged or in another category of pressing import, and generally (though not exclusively) drawing on objective data.

On a longer time scale, all academic programs engage in internal Program Review, a more comprehensive process in which the program takes the lead on taking stock in itself with a detailed Self-Study, augmented by careful reviews by disciplinary experts outside of Seton Hall, internal faculty colleagues in different programs, and the Faculty Senate Program Review process.

Finally, the entire University is subject to periodic review by its regional accreditor, Middle States, on a recurring basis and on different scales (most notably, the University-wide review that will culminate in a visiting Middle States team in 2024). Likewise, many of our disciplines, particularly those with a professional focus, engage in national or regional accreditation through a disciplinary lens and through peer accreditors such as AACSB, CAEP, and the ABA, among others.

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