School of Medicine Logo

Lectures

Title: Identifying & Managing Your Own Implicit Bias to Improve Health Outcomes

David S. Kountz, MD

Summary: Implicit bias is prevalent and can be a driver for health care disparities, and unequal health outcomes. The purpose and content of this course is to enable health care providers to embrace the fact that we all have biases and appreciate that unconscious biases are more prevalent than conscious ones. Awareness of the potential of one’s biases is the first step to address it. It is important for all of us to be honest about our biases and “flashlight” ourselves to become aware and eliminate implicit biases in our role as health care providers for everyone. Empathy plays a very important role in this process. This timely course will present insightful strategies to de-bias patient care, which include training, intergroup contact, and counter-stereotypical exemplars. The Implicit Association Test (Project Implicit) will be described.

Title: Sexual Minority Youth - Caring for the LGBTQ Patient

John B. Steever, MD

Summary: Whether you are aware of it or not, youth in your care may be lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning their sexual orientation or gender identity. These young people are dealing not only with the challenges of life in foster care but also with the risk of harassment and mistreatment because they are LGBTQ, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer. LGBTQ youth experience unique health and developmental challenges compared to their peers.

THIS EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY is an innovative medical symposium designed to update physicians and other health care professionals to become more familiar with caring for the LGBTQ patient and overcoming the barriers to care. Participants will learn about ways in which health care providers can support LGBTQ youth in navigating these challenges and improving their health outcomes. It will also address consent and confidentiality issues related to sexual and reproductive health care, as well as to disclosure of sexual orientation and gender identity among LGBTQ minors and young adults.

Title: Creating a Welcoming Environment For Transgender Patients and Families

John B. Steever, MD

Summary: Some transgender patients are more likely than their heterosexual peers to experience negative health and life outcomes. It is critical for health care providers to have access to the resources they need to ensure their transgender patients are protected and supported. The ED often is the access point of choice for transgender patients who may be reluctant to interact with providers. Experts say there is a need for training and education of how to present a gender-affirming healthcare environment. Recommended steps include a review of policies, along with corresponding changes to electronic and paper intake forms to ensure that the language used is inclusive of all genders. While blanket discrimination may be declining, experts note that some providers are uncertain about how to interact with a transgender patient.

THIS EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY is designed to update physicians and other health care professionals to become more familiar with caring for the transgender patient and overcoming the barriers to care. Participants will learn about ways in which health care providers can support transgender patients in navigating these challenges and improving their health outcomes.