K Nagle.

 

Kathleen Nagle, PhD, CCC-SLP
Assistant Professor
Department of Speech-Language Pathology

973-275-2800
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McQuaid Hall
Room 201

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Kathleen Nagle, PhD, CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor
Department of Speech-Language Pathology

I joined the faculty of the Department of Speech-Language Pathology after completing a post-doctoral research experience at the Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston. At MGH, I investigated the association between acoustic and perceptual characteristics of alaryngeal speech produced with an electrolarynx with EMG-activated pitch modulation. I also supervised production and perception experiments on a device that used pre-programmed tones to increase acceptability and intelligibility of Mandarin electrolaryngeal speech.

Prior to obtaining my PhD at the University of Washington (UW), I worked as an SLP in the Edmonds Public School District and supervised pediatric student practica at the UW Speech and Hearing Clinic. At the UW clinic, I also developed and ran the Pronunciation Improvement Program for non-native speakers of American English. Working with non-native speakers is my first love!

At Seton Hall, I teach Introduction to Communication Disorders for undergraduates, and Voice Disorders, Research Methods II and Biomedical Ethics for graduate students. My favorite courses allow me to combine didactic and practical methods by using my clinical experience to bring the topic to life. I like to use whatever tools are handy to make teaching and learning more efficient and enjoyable.

My primary research focus is auditory-perceptual rating scales. This interest stems from the question I wrestled with attempting to provide evidence-based outcome measures to my students working on foreign accent modification;that is, how can we measure change in speech that is not well-described using measures of intelligibility? I have approached this question by investigating perceived listener effort (PLE), or the amount of effort required by a listener to listen to and understand disordered or different speech, and by digging deeply into the psychometrics of perceptual ratings.

As Director of the Speech and Voice Outcomes (SVO) Lab, I am currently investigating the reliability of expert ratings on the CAPE-V (a commonly used perceptual rating scale for disordered voice). I am working with the Stepp Lab at Boston University on a study of the reliability and validity of different scale types for measuring PLE, and I continue to collaborate with the Voice Center at MGH on projects involving my secondary research interests: prosody, alaryngeal speech and how to improve the prosody of alaryngeal speech.

Frequent collaborators: Tanya L. Eadie (University of Washington), James T. Heaton (MGH, Harvard Medical School), Cara E. Stepp (Boston University)