News & Events

F.D.A. Commissioner Keynotes Inaugural Pharmaceutical Forum
Seton Hall > News & Events 

From left: Adrian Adams, president and CEO of Kos Pharmaceuticals; Andrew C. von Eschenbach, acting F.D.A. Commissioner; and Robert E. Baldini '53, vice chairman of Kos Pharmaceuticals.
From left: Adrian Adams, president and CEO of Kos Pharmaceuticals; Andrew C. von Eschenbach, acting F.D.A. Commissioner; and Robert E. Baldini '53, vice chairman of Kos Pharmaceuticals

University President Monsignor Sheeran presents a memento to Dr. von Eschenbach.
University President Monsignor Sheeran presents a memento to Dr. von Eschenbach

Kathleen Boozang, associate dean for Academic Affairs at the School of Law, moderated the Q&A session.
Kathleen Boozang, associate dean for Academic Affairs at the School of Law, moderated the Q&A session.

Dr. von Eschenbach addresses questions after his keynote address.
Dr. von Eschenbach addresses questions after his keynote address.

With once-seemingly impossible advances in medicine now within reach, humankind is on the verge of radical change, said Andrew C. von Eschenbach, M.D., acting commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Von Eschenbach outlined a future filled with medical breakthroughs during Seton Hall's inaugural Pharmaceutical Leaders Forum, held Sept. 14 in the Chancellor's Suite.

"It is our responsibility to be the architects of that future," the F.D.A. chief told the audience of pharmaceutical executives as well as representatives of U.S. Senator Frank Lautenberg and U.S. Representative Mike Ferguson. Joining these leaders were Seton Hall regents, administrators and faculty members. "The lives of millions of people not only in this nation but around the entire world are dependent on what we in fact do and what we will in fact create."

The commissioner sees a world where health care will become preventive, personalized, proactive and interactive. Increasingly, diseases will be halted before starting or detected before worsening, he explained. If an illness develops, treatment will be tailored for the individual.

Von Eschenbach emphasized that dialogue between government and industry is essential. And the academic community plays a vital role in this discussion. "It's even more important to me to be here today at Seton Hall and for this particular conference ... to do that in this setting of this University in which our intellectual pursuits are nested in a context of the values that must drive that progress."

Seton Hall has much to offer in this world of progress. New Jersey – home to 20 of the world's leading pharmaceutical firms – is at the epicenter of these medical innovations. 

University President Monsignor Robert Sheeran '67, S.T.D., pointed out, "Seton Hall University – with our almost 10,000 students – has much to offer your industry. We teach our students to be the kind of workers and the kind of thinkers whom you want to employ."

He added: "We share great ideas and discuss concrete solutions for the real world."


For more information please contact:
Leena Santore
(973) 378-9855
santorle@shu.edu

 

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