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SHU Sports Poll Reveals Public Attitude Towards Tiger Woods
Seton Hall > News & Events 

Golf SETON HALL SPORTS POLL FINDS OVERWHELMING MAJORITY SUPPORTS TIGER WOODS’S RIGHT TO HIS PRIVACY
 
S. Orange, NJ, December 3, 2009 –  An overwhelming majority of Americans believe that Tiger Woods does not have an obligation to provide details of the incident involving his one-car accident last Friday morning.
 
The Seton Hall Sports Poll was conducted among 1,052 people across the country this week.
 
Of the full sample, 78% responded “no” when asked if the public has the right to know the details of the incident, with 15% saying yes, and 7% saying they did not know.
 
“Tiger has built up a reservoir of popularity over his career, and has generally been seen as a good guy”, said Rick Gentile, director of the Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted by the Sharkey Institute.  “Not all sports figures would get this support.  The fans have made an investment in this man, and strongly support his right to privacy.”
 
Among the group that follows sports, the total was 81% responding “no,” 15% “yes” and 4% “no opinion.”
 
“Across the board – male and female, black and white, the support for his privacy is remarkably consistent, said Gentile.  “Past questions about, say Barry Bonds, have had responses strongly differing among racial lines.  That’s not at all the case with Tiger.”
 
The number drops to 62% “no” among those who don’t follow sports at all, with 18% saying “yes.”  Nineteen percent had no opinion.
 
“The only real difference,” said Gentile,  – 81% vs. 62% supporting his right to privacy, comes among those who are sports fans or not, and there, his popularity among sports fans wins him extra favor.  Sports fans have stuck with Tiger and made him the world’s most popular athlete for more than a decade.  Non sports-fans show less empathy.”   
 
The poll was conducted by telephone among a random digit dial sample between November 30-December 2, 2009. The poll was weighted to reflect the national distribution age, race and gender. The margin of error due to sampling is +/- 3.1 percentage points for most estimates.  The margin of error is higher for certain sub groups.  Other factors also may affect the total error.

For more information please contact:
Rick Gentile
(973) 761-9222
gentilri@shu.edu

 

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