News & Events

America's Least Stressful and Best Ranked Jobs 2009
Seton Hall > News & Events 

Occupational TherapyFeeling overworked and overwhelmed? Maybe it's time for a career change to one of these fields from Money and Payscale.com list of America's best jobs.
 
Occupational Therapist  (OT)
Best Jobs rank: 14
50% of OTs say their job is low stress!
Occupational therapists work with people who have some kind of impairment - from a physical injury to behavioral problems or even mental illness -- and help them to reengage in activities at work, home and school that their impairment has made difficult. That can be emotionally tough, but also very rewarding. Plus, the job is highly flexible: It can be practiced in a variety of settings, from a school or hospital to a home situation or health clinic. Many OTs also work part-time.
 
Physical Therapist  (PT)
Excellence and CreativityBest Jobs rank: 7
59.5 % of PTs say their job is low stress!
Thanks to an aging population and medical advances, PT is a well-paid, fast-growing field. PTs mostly work in hospitals or group practices, have flexible hours and, unlike some other health-care professionals, rarely work nighttime shifts. One-quarter of physical therapists work part-time or are self-employed.
 
Physician Assistant (PA)
Best Jobs rank: 2
Working under the supervision of a physician, PAs do all tasks involved in routine medical care, such as diagnosing illnesses and assisting in surgery. PAs can write prescriptions as well.
Why it's great: You get the satisfaction of treating patients minus insurance hassles, since PAs have far less administrative responsibility than the typical MD. Since PAs don't need as much specialized training as physicians, PAs can change their area of practice from geriatrics to emergency care with relative ease.
 
Speech-Language Pathologist  (SLPs)
Best Jobs rank: 27
53% of SLPs say their job is low stress!
These health-care professionals help people who are have trouble with speech or communication. About half work in educational services; most others are employed by health care and social assistance facilities. Though the work can be intense, it is not physically demanding and about half work in schools and get summers off.

For more information please contact:
Deborah Verderosa
(973) 275-2062
deborah.verderosa@shu.edu

 

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