Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology
Catholic Studies

For more information, please e-mail: theology@shu.edu

Graduate Courses for Fall 2015
Biblical Studies

BIBL/PTHO 6724 Jewish Roots of Christian Spirituality

This course will be a survey of the Jewish roots of Christian spirituality, with special attention to prayer (person and communal) and liturgy (particularly the Eucharist). Students will examine theological roots of Jewish spirituality, the Psalms, and Catholic-Jewish dialogue today.

Dr. Gregory Glazov Tuesday 6:30- 9 PM

BIBL 6505 Pauline Literature

This course will serve as an introduction to the New Testament letters of St. Paul. After a brief introduction to the life and world of the apostle, each of his letters will be considered. Particular attention will be paid to the historical and cultural contexts of his congregations, as well as the literary and rhetorical strategies Paul employs in his correspondence. In this way we will come to understand the fundamentals of both Paul's theology (what God has done in Christ) and pastoral vision (how Christians are to respond).

Rev. Christopher Ciccarino Monday &Wednesday 11:30 AM-12:45 PM

BIBL 6203 Prophetic Literature

This course will be a study of the authority, role and key concepts of the Hebrew prophets in the context of their own times and the possible paradigms for the present.It will also include an in-depth study of significant passages in the classical prophets, as well as exegesis of selected texts.

Dr. Gregory Glazov Tuesday &Thursday 11:30 AM-12:45 PM

BIBL 6501 Synoptic Gospels

This course provides a historical and critical approach to the study of the gospels, its limits and benefits and its acceptability to the Church. The "synoptic problem" and consequences of its resolution for the study of the gospels. Students will examine diverse forms within the gospels and characteristics of each gospels.

Rev. Pablo Gadenz Monday &Wednesday 11:30 AM-12:45 PM

BIBL/HSTD 6120 The Holy Land in the First Century

What were the circumstances that have made the biblical land of Israel the stage for some of the most dramatic and influential events of world history and faith? In three parts, this course will aim to provide a better understanding of this region during the first century BC and AD. First, it will examine the region, the land and the landscape. Second, it will explore the social and political interactions among the many different inhabitants who shared the land. Third, it will examine the culture, the customs, the ways ofworship and the daily life of the local communities, with an emphasis on the Jewish/ Judean community.

David Hyman, Visiting Lecturer Thursday 8:30 –11:15 AM

Christian Ethics 

CETH 6407 Catholic Social Teaching

This course will explore theological aspects of Catholic social justice ministry, its scriptural foundations, and its major principles as articulated in papal and episcopal documents. The application of these principles are aimed towards family, work, economic systems, and political orders. An examination of how local churches and parishes can become effective instruments in bringing about Gods reign of peace and justice will be made as well. 

Dr. Justin M. Anderson • Monday 8:30-11:15 AM 

CETH 6205 Healthcare Ethics 

In this course, students will develop skills in using Catholic Church     teaching and Natural Law argumentation by examining the concepts of health, the human person, personal and social responsibility, confidentiality, reproductive technologies, abortion, medical  research,  experimentation, transplants, psychotherapy, addiction, suicide, euthanasia, and care of the  disabled, those with AIDS and the dying. 

Dr. Justin M. Anderson • Monday & Wednesday 11:30 AM-12:45 PM  

CETH/STHO 6259 Secularism and Catholicism 

This course investigates the historical causes, nature, and value of secularism as a cultural, and socio-political phenomenon affecting Catholic religious experience in what was once called Latin Christendom. The course is not only interested in secularism as such, but also in various contemporary Catholic responses towards it. Throughout the investigation will be viewed through the theological lens of Christian faith as revealed in Jesus Christ and authoritatively interpreted through the teaching authority of the Church. 

Dr.  Justin M. Anderson • Monday & Wednesday 1:30-2:45 PM 

CETH/STHO 6114 The Problem of Evil 

This course begins with some reflections about experiences of evil in a globalized world, society and culture. The course then examines how Holy Scripture approaches the problem of evil.     Systematic reflections follow, focusing on the theological question: “Why does the good and omnipotent God create the human being capable of evil?” Finally, the course presents Christ on the cross and in the resurrection. 

Rev. Peter Albano • Monday 6:30-9:30 PM

Church History

HSTD 6807 American Christianity 

In this course, students will have the opportunity to study the development of Christianity in the Americas from the beginnings of evangelization to the present, by focusing on the Catholic Church in the United States; the  impact of the English Reformation as setting the stage for the major cultural forces influencing the present-day United States; growth of the Church in the English colonies and its subsequent expansion, particularly due to 19th and 20th century  immigration;  Catholic education and the evolution of pastoral ministry; issues facing  Catholicism in its contemporary encounter with cultural forces in America today. 

Rev. Msgr. Robert J. Wister • Monday 8:30-11:15 AM  

HSTD 6201 History of Christianity I 

This survey course will provide an overview of the persons, events, institutions, movements and theological issues involved in the development of Christianity over twelve centuries from the close of the Apostolic Age to the advent of the Protestant Reformation.   

Rev. Msgr. Robert J. Wister • Tuesday 8:30-11:15 AM

HSTD 6268 History of Vatican II

It has been a half-century since the opening of the Second Vatican Council, the watershed religious event of the twentieth century. This course will look at the ecclesial trends of the 20th century leading up to the Council, with a special emphasis on the years between the War and the Council. It will examine the Council itself, including the personalities of the Council (with particular emphasis on Popes John XXIII and Paul VI), as well as the energy and operation of the Council, and finally, the aftermath and reception of the Council. In addition, there will be an exploration of the actual documents of the Council and their impact on the Church and society.   

Rev. Msgr. Raymond Kupke Tuesday 6:30-9:00 PM

HSTD/PTHO 6710 Women Mystics 

This course is an exploration of the phenomenon and meaning of mysticism.  A study of the lives, times and spirituality of such women mystics as Teresa of Avila, Thérèse of Lisieux, Edith Stein, Catherine of Siena, Faustina, Elizabeth of the Trinity and Julian of Norwich.  An analysis of their major writings, including autobiographies, letters and poetry.   

Dr. Dianne M. Traflet • Wednesday 6:30-9:00 PM

Systematic Theology  

STHO 6203 Christology NA 

In this course, students will explore the faith response to the Mystery of Jesus Christ, God’s gift to us, in Scripture and Church tradition, and an attempt to answer the question “Who do you say I am?” [Mt. 16:15] in light of contemporary concerns. 

  Rev. Lawrence B. Porter • Monday 6:30-9:00 PM  

STHO 6203 Christology 

Course Description: In this course, students will explore the faith response to the Mystery of Jesus Christ, God’s gift to us, in Scripture and Church tradition, and an attempt to answer the question “Who do you say I am?” [Mt. 16:15] in light of contemporary concerns.    

Rev. Lawrence B. Porter • Wednesday 8:30-11:15 AM 

STHO 6505 Eucharist 

A Biblical, systematic, liturgical and pastoral treatment of the Eucharist and the development of the Mass.  Questions relating to institution, real presence, sacred meal, sacrifice, eschatology and ecumenism are examined. An historical approach will trace the     development of the theology of the Eucharist and its liturgical expression.  Implications for various theological topics, spirituality, morality, ecumenism and pastoral practice will be highlighted throughout.  The course will conclude with a study of the liturgical celebration of the Eucharist renewed by the Second Vatican Council and related theological themes 

Rev. John J. Chadwick • Tuesday 8:30-11:15 AM 

STHO 6022 Graduate Research Seminar 

This course will provide a general introduction to the resources (print, electronic, and personnel) of a graduate theological library. Students will receive an extended introduction to the theological resources and methods proper to each of the sacred sciences. Students will be guided to develop the practice of critical reading and analysis needed for graduate academic study.  Students will also be introduced to introductory graduate academic writing. (2 credits) 

Staff • Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 AM – 12:45 PM  

STHO 6202 Revelation and Faith 

A historical and systematic examination of the Catholic understanding of God’s Self-Communication and humanity’s correlative response in faith will be made in this course. Students will have an opportunity to focus on revelation: transmission of revelation; natural and supernatural revelation; Reformation and sola Scriptura; Trent and tradition; Newman on doctrinal development; and la nouvelle théologie and Vatican II. Students  also will explore faith: grace and faith; faith and scholasticism; Luther and sola fides; Trent on fides fiducialis; Vatican I and rational preparation for the act of faith; Blondel and the apologetics of immanence; and contemporary attempts (e.g., Rahner, Tracy, Metz) to ground the act of faith. 

Rev. Thomas G. Guarino • Monday 8:30-11:15 AM  

STHO 6434 The Gifts and Charisms of the Holy Spirit

Utilizing the insights of the Fathers of the Church, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of St. Thomas, and various contemporary theologians and spiritual writers, this elective course will investigate the rich spiritual tradition of the Seven Gifts of the Holy Spirit.  The students will     consider the nature of the Gifts as well as the relationship of each Gift to the theological and moral virtues and the Gospel beatitudes.  Special attention will be given to the nature of Christian mysticism, ecclesial charisms, and the role of the Holy Spirit in the various Christian states of life. 

Rev. Frederick L. Miller • Thursday 6:30 – 9:00 PM  

STHO 6204 The Trinity

A systematic and historical examination of the doctrine of the Triune God: dialectical nature of God as both hidden and revealed, immanent and transcendent; attributes and perfections of God; Patristic and Conciliar debates about the nature of the Trinity; persons, processions, relations and missions within the Godhead; speculation in relation to the “economic” and “immanent” Trinity, as well as contemporary retrievals of psychological analogies will be made in this course. 

Rev. Thomas G. Guarino • Tuesday 8:30 – 11:15 AM 

STHO 6501 Worship of the Church 

In this course, students will be introduced to the theology of liturgy and the historical development of liturgy in the Catholic Church while analyzing the Roman Rite. Students will explore the history and theological development of the Mass, the Liturgy of the Hours, and the Roman Calendar. 

Rev. Msgr. Gerard McCarren • Wednesday 8:30 – 11:15 AM  

STEPS Program (Off-site: Ridgewood, NJ)

STHO 6202 Revelation and Faith

An historical and systematic examination of the Catholic understanding of God’s Self-Communication and humanity’s correlative response in faith will be made in this course. Students will have an opportunity to focus on revelation: transmission of revelation; natural and supernatural revelation; Reformation and sola Scriptura; Trent and tradition; Newman on doctrinal development; and la nouvelle théologie and Vatican II. Students  also will explore faith: grace and faith; faith and scholasticism; Luther and sola fides; Trent on fides fiducialis; Vatican I and rational preparation for the act of faith; Blondel and the apologetics of immanence; and contemporary attempts (e.g., Rahner, Tracy, Metz) to ground the act of faith.

Rev. Anthony Mastroeni • Thursday 6:30 – 9:00 PM

BIBL 6506 Introduction to Pauline & Johannine Literature

This course will introduce students to an appreciation of various historical, literary, and theological aspects of the Fourth Gospel and of Paul’s Letters, especially those to the Galatians and Romans. Special attention will be paid to the way in which these writings reflect, interpret, and develop the early Christian kerygma (proclamation) and thereby contribute to the Christian interpretation of Jesus, person and mission (Christology and Soteriology) and the means by which faith in him as the Christ and Son of God communicates abundant life (the Sacraments and Ecclesiology). 

Dr. Casmir Stroik • Monday 6:30 – 9:00 PM

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