Academic Scholarship

Women, the Novel, and Natural Philosophy, 1660-1727

New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

Women, the Novel, and Natural Philosophy, 1660-1727 by Karen Bloom Gevirtz, Ph.D. Karen B. Gevirtz, Ph.D.
Department of English

Women, the Novel, and Natural Philosophy, 1660-1727 shows how early women novelists drew on debates about the self generated by the 'scientific' revolution to establish the novel as a genre and literary omniscience as a point of view. These writers such as Aphra Behn, Jane Barker, Eliza Haywood, and Mary Davys used, tested, explored, accepted, and rejected ideas about the self in their works to represent the act of knowing and what it means to be a knowing self. Karen Bloom Gevirtz agues that as they did so, they developed structures for representing authoritative knowing that contributed to the development of the novel as a genre, and to literary omniscience as a point of view. 

 
 

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