School of Health and Medical Sciences

OutcomesSeton Hall University embraces the principle that effective and meaningful assessment is an integral part of the educational process. This principle is at the heart of our commitment to meet our responsibilities to our students, professions, and the communities that we serve. University Assessment Site »

Upon successful completion of the Master of Science in Physician Assistant program, graduates will possess:


The skills necessary to elicit an appropriate history and physical examination  to develop a rational differential diagnosis for a patient. Method of assessment:
  • Year One: Simulated interviews and practical examinations are conducted during the first year of the program.
  • Years Two and Three: Ongoing evaluation of student history-taking and physical examination skills takes place throughout their clinical experiences. 
  • Years Two and Three: Post-rotation examinations assess ability utilizing historical and physical exam findings to develop a differential diagnosis.
  • Year Three: A final objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) must be passed prior to graduation.

The ability to effectively communicate and convey medical information verbally and in writing to both medical personnel and patients. Method of assessment:

  • Year One: Simulated patient encounters and documentation exercises.
  • Years Two and Three: Clinical site visits evaluate students’ ability to orally convey patient information.
  • Years Two and Three: Rotation documentation and oral presentations are evaluated by core program faculty.

The core biomedical knowledge necessary for clinical diagnosis and patient management in a variety of settings. Method of assessment:
  • Year One: A wide variety of online and in-class assessments monitor student progress through their coursework.
  • Years Two and Three: Post-rotation examinations ensure that students have mastered key concepts fundamental to a particular medical specialty. 
  • Years Two and Three: Clinical site visits survey each student’s fund of knowledge while on clinical rotations.
  • Years Two and Three: Organ system-based formative and summative examinations afford students and faculty the opportunity to assess global knowledge and retention of important material.

An understanding of professional behavior, the American healthcare system and the role of the physician assistant in the medical community. Methods of assessment:

  • Year One: During the admission and interview process, candidates are assessed regarding their understanding of the role of a physician assistant.
  • Years Two and Three: Students are assessed by each preceptor regarding professional behavior while on clinical rotations.
  • Years Two and Three: Students complete a comprehensive professionalism self-assessment at the end of the academic year and review it with their faculty advisor.
  • Year Three: Coursework in healthcare policy requires students to demonstrate an understanding of the role of a physician assistant and barriers to accessible, cost-effective, comprehensive healthcare. Students complete online exercises and presentations. Students are able to list ways that physician assistants and nurse practitioners contribute to a team approach to healthcare delivery.

An appreciation for the importance of critically reviewing medical literature and incorporating evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies into medical practice. Method of assessment:

  • Year One: Coursework in evidence-based medicine requires that students demonstrate an ability to conduct an appropriate literature review.
  • Years Two and Three: Students are assessed in their ability to develop a hypothesis, design a study, collect and analyze data and draw an appropriate conclusion.
  • Year Three: Coursework in epidemiology assesses the ability of students to critically review the medical literature to appraise study design and quality.

An attitude that values respect, tolerance and ethical behavior. Method of assessment:

  • Year One: Coursework incorporates material addressing cross-cultural healthcare and working with patients with low health-literacy.
  • Years One, Two and Three: Multiple courses asses the ability of students to engage in respectful, collaborative work.
  • Years Two and Three: Performance on research coursework demonstrates the ability of students to address ethical issues in research design.
  • Years Two and Three: The interpersonal interactions of students are assessed by preceptors on each clinical rotation. 
  • Year Three: Coursework in biomedical ethics requires that students demonstrate the ability to apply ethical concepts including autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice.

A commitment to lifelong learning. Method of assessment:

  • NCCPA statistics are reviewed annually to monitor rates of ongoing certification for alumni.

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