College of Arts & Sciences

Spring 2014

JCST 6009 Hebrew Bible Reading III Frizzell
JCST 6013 Hebrew and Catholic Epistles Frizzell
JCST 6014
Lessons from the Holocaust Bossman
JCST 7030 Law and Ethics: Jewish and Christian Perspectives Frizzell
JCST 7576
Personal Rights and Responsibilities for a Just Society Bossman
JCST 7579
Christian Theologies of Judaism: Ancient and Modern Sciglitano

Fall 2014

JCST 6001 Christian-Jewish Encounter
(Required of all Certificate Students)
Frizzell
Thursday
6:15-8:25 p.m.
JCST 6005 Hebrew Bible Readings I
Frizzell
TBA
JCST 6016 Values for a Pluralistic Society
Bossman
Wednesday
5-7:10 p.m.
JCST 6017 Jewish-Christian Foundations for Social Service
Bossman
Tuesday
5-7:10 p.m.
JCST 6024 Medieval Jewish Thinkers Brill
Monday
5-7:10 p.m.
JCST 7036
Peace and War: Biblical and Jewish Tradition Frizzell
Monday
6:15-8:25 p.m.
JCST 7544
Judaism and Other Religions Brill
Tuesday
5-7:10 p.m.
JCST 9001
Thesis
Frizzell


Hebrew Bible Reading III:

This reading will focus on the Hebrew (Massoretic) text of the prophet Zechariah, chapters 1-8. If time allows, selected passages from chapters 9-14 will be considered. Knowledge of Hebrew is required.
2 credits

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Hebrews and Catholic Epistles:

This investigation of New Testament texts, the Epistle to the Hebrews and the seven Catholic (general) Epistles explores early Christian understanding of the faith in Jesus and moral life and its relation to the Jewish Scriptures and the Jewish people.
3 credits

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Lessons from the Holocaust:

This course deals with the personal and societal impact of prejudice and hatred; exclusionary and destructive societal practices relating to race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity and political views; institutionalized anti-Semitism in Germany under the Nazis; social world conditions that minimize personal freedoms and lead to genocidal behavior; probing alternative educational models. This course aims to identify reachable topics that correspond with the range of issues underlying the Holocaust. We will set an agenda or educators in developing lesson plans and exploring resources.
3 credits

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Law and Ethics: Jewish and Christian Perspectives:

This course explores the Covenant and Torah in ancient Israel, law and ethics in the wisdom tradition, Torah and commandments in the literature of the Second Temple period, the Sadducees and the Qumran community, and the Pharisaic teaching concerning written and oral Torah. Approaches of the New Testament writers and the Rabbis to Covenant, law and ethics will be studied. Great legal codes of Medieval Jewry, canon law, law versus Gospel in Luther's thought, and Calvin's reverence for law comprise a section of study. Ethics concerning the family and sanctity of life in modern thought, and structures in society as opposed to nihilism and terrorism to complete this study.
3 credits

×

Personal Rights and Responsibilities for a Just Society:

This course will address issues in urban schools that undermine personal rights and responsibilities such as bullying and coercive gang practices (based on such factors as race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religion, social class, or locality). In light of Holocaust and Genocide studies, this course will apply remedies that have been tested and proven effective for raising critical awareness of causes and effects of destructive social behavior. It will develop a curriculum to engender personal responsibility for building an inclusive social order necessary for a just society.

The outcomes of the course will be tailored teaching units for confronting destructive group practices and for building models that promote personal responsibility and leadership.
3 credits

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Christian Theologies of Judaism: Ancient and Modern:

Christian Theologies of Judaism seeks to draw an analogy between the early period of Christian development and the modern cultural situation of Christians; both are times when Christian self-definition is fluid and in contention and when relation to Judaism is of defining interest. This course studies the different ways in which Christian thinkers from early and modern Christianity understand Judaism in relation to both Christianity and to their surrounding cultural milieu, including religious, mythological and philosophical discourses. Of particular interest will be how Christians think of themes such as covenant, law, freedom, revelation, religion,God, and history in relation to Judaism and and how Christians define themselves in continuity and discontinuity with the Jewish people. Toward the end of class, we switch our focus and briefly examine Christianity through non-Christian eyes.
3 credits

×
Contact Us

Department of Religion
(973) 761-9480
Fahy Hall Rm. 322

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